Lung Cancer Screening

Detecting lung cancer early and having it surgically removed has shown to improve five year survival to greater than 70%. Using Cat Scan (CT) lung screening in high risk patients has shown to decrease cancer death by 20% according to the recently published National Lung Screening Trial.

Low Dose CT Screenings is now covered by many insurance plans if the patient qualifies with the following indications. Low Dose CT Screening is recommended for patients who meet the following criteria:

  1. ARE YOU 55–74 YEARS OLD?
  2. ARE YOU A CURRENT SMOKER OR FORMER SMOKER WHO QUIT WITHIN THE PAST 15 YEARS?
  3.  DO YOU HAVE 30 OR MORE PACK YEARS OF SMOKING?

Your pack years is the average number of cigarette packs you have smoked per day multiplied by the number of years you have smoked. Example: 1.5 packs per day for 20 years would equal a 30 pack year (1.5 packs x 20 years)

For more information, please call 806-212-LUNG (5864).

Should your screening show something that requires further follow-up, one of our Nurse Navigators will assist you in getting a diagnostic work-up and if necessary, help you navigate through treatment options.

Low dose, No contrast

  • Lung cancer screening is performed utilizing a low-dose technique which is approximately 1/6 of the radiation of conventional CT of the chest.
  • Screening CT is performed without intravenous contrast (no IV is required).

Convenient Scheduling

  • Scan can be scheduled in as little as one week
  • Scan only takes minutes to complete

You’ve had your screening…now what?

  • Your doctor will receive the results after it is read by a radiologist
    • Contact your physician if you don’t receive the results of your scan
  • You will receive a call from a nurse at Harrington Cancer Center who will discuss the results with you
  • Based on the results of your screening, you may need one of the following
  • Follow-up CT in 3-6 months or in 12 months
  • Further follow-up possibly including tests or specialist visits

Time to Quit

Smoking Cessation Classes Available

DID YOU KNOW...

  • 48 Hours after quitting
    • Carbon monoxide level in the blood may return to normal
  • 2 to 12 weeks after quitting
  • Circulation may improve and lung function can increase
  • Excess risk of coronary heart disease is half that of a smoker’s risk
  • Risk of lung cancer death is half that of a smoker’s risk
  • Risk of stroke and coronary heart disease is that of a non-smoker’s risk
  • 1 Year after quitting
  • 10+ Years after quitting
  • 15+ Years after quitting

* Statistics from American Cancer Society

We know quitting can be difficult.  Let us help.

(806) 463-QUIT (7848)